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Is MV Godzilla a inherently pro-nuclear metaphor?

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Gmkgoji #TeamRodan

Nov-05-2019 1:40 PM

In Godzilla king of the monsters, Serzawa uses a nuke to revive Godzilla, therefore allowing Godzilla to fight King ghidorah again. Simply put, the nuke is the one thing that is the saving grace in the movie. Burning Godzilla also practically nukes the entirety of Boston to kill Ghidorah, which, though Ghidorah was defeated, Boston was entirely destroyed. Also, the radiation fallout is seen as a good thing rather than a bad thing, as the titans leave behind radiation that bolsters plant life. HOWEVER, the original 1954 film portrayed the nuclear fallout as a horrific thing. The two films differ vastly in terms of the view Nuclear energy/power. Is Godzilla: king of the monsters saying Nuclear power is a nessacary evil?

Godzilla x Symphogear:

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG

78 Responses to Is MV Godzilla a inherently pro-nuclear metaphor?

TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-05-2019 2:10 PM

Valid point, but I don't think so. I think the main point of the helping plant thing was more focused on the good of working with nature than radiation. If it really is a metaphor for Pro-Nuclear... the ending is kind of genius. Godzilla brutally kills Ghidorah and destroys all of Boston, with one person saying "Glad he's on our side," with another saying "for now..." Then all the 17 woken up Kaiju stand around him and bow down, despite being able to kill him. If each Kaiju is a country, then Godzilla is probably America. Ghidorah, with his 3 heads, would represent the axis in WW2 in my opinion. The middle head would probably be Japan, since it was the one affected by nuclear warfare and the middle head got brutalized in the film. The other Kaiju, despite probably being able to kill Godzilla, stand down in fear and respect, so Godzilla, or America, is now the main superpower. So... I guess that makes Kong Russia during the Cold War? SOVIET KONG!!!!

 

I mean, if it really is a metaphor for nuclear power, then it would be a kinda genius representation of WW2 at the end. But I kinda doubt it, I think it's just meant to be an environmentally driven film rather than nuclear warfare. But its still possible. Thanks for the thought provoking question, I never would have thought of that!

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

Flyleaf-Rapt0r #TeamMothra

Nov-05-2019 2:10 PM

That's an interesting thought.

Very strange....................

hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

when you with your bff and your team wins 

 

Titan of Water #TeamGodzilla

Nov-05-2019 2:12 PM

Yeah it does seem pretty pro nuclear to me. The fact that the radiation literally restores ecosystems is a big clue, as well as Godzilla being revived by a nuclear bomb. I mean, if Mike or the writers have a pro-nuclear stance, they’re allowed to have that worldview, but they shouldn’t have put it in the movie. I think they could’ve been more respectful to the original without compromising their own world views.

Putting incorrect opinions in their place! Gatekeeping power!!

MinecraftDinoKaiju #TeamGodzilla

Nov-05-2019 2:24 PM

That is really interesting. I mean, if Michael Dougherty really was being loyal to the franchise, then he should've made that a big point in the film.

Then again, he wasn't loyal to what the Oxygen Destroyer represented as a whole and decided to instead have it make a cameo and never be mentioned again (Even though it is literally equally as important as the Infinity Gauntlet. This is for any Marvel fans who read this in the future. You're welcome.), so who knows, really?

TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-05-2019 2:40 PM

I argue it's MORE important than the infinity gauntlet. It's basically as important as the Avengers! I mean, it killed the main villain and spawned one of the most powerful beings ever known.

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

Flyleaf-Rapt0r #TeamMothra

Nov-05-2019 2:41 PM

y e p

when you with your bff and your team wins 

 

Gmkgoji #TeamRodan

Nov-05-2019 2:49 PM

S

O

V

I

E

T

 

K

O

N

G

Godzilla x Symphogear:

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG

Titan of Water #TeamGodzilla

Nov-05-2019 3:08 PM

Commentary on this thread by a friend from Wikizilla:

So I saw that there's this thread going on over on SciFied's Godzilla News page, and seeing as how I don't have an account but you do, I just wanted to share my thoughts on it.

I almost feel like Serizawa's sacrifice is a sort of reconciliation between Man and Monster. Both sides have done terrible things to each other. We dropped the bomb that either mutated or awakened Godzilla, and left him the last–and first–of his kind. He's slaughtered thousands, if not millions, in return.

But there comes a time when people need to move on from the sins of the past. When we must put aside our woes and rivalries to strive for a better future. To quote Serizawa, "Sometimes the only way to heal our wounds is to make peace with the demons who created them."

Serizawa is a man who's family bore witness to the Hiroshima bombings. And now, all these years later, he takes that weapon of destruction and turns it into a force for good. He turns death into a new chance for life, so that the whole world can wake up and live again.

Nuclear power on it's own is a neutral tool. How it's used depends on who that power is given to. If you give a knife to a surgeon or a murderer, they will each use it a different way. Nuclear power is capable of great harm, yes, but it can also be used for great good. Nuclear power is one of the cleanest sources of energy we have on hand right now, at least in terms of greenhouse gases and carbon emissions.

I've noticed that Godzilla changes as the real-world changes around him. When he first debuted in 1954, he was, as everyone knows, an allegory for the horrors of nuclear warfare. But then, as time went on, he shifted from an all-out monster to a much more benevolent guardian of Earth, as seen in the late 60's and early 70's. Coincidentally, and even as far back as the 50's, nuclear power was harnessed not as a force for destruction, but as a new source of energy. I doubt Godzilla's shift to a hero had anything to do with it, but it is still something to note. And then he was rebooted in 1984. Tensions between various Cold War powers were very much tangible, and nuclear war was yet again a big concern, and Godzilla was shifted accordingly. Shin Godzilla was made in response to Japan's facing of several natural disasters in recent years, such as the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami.

In other words, Godzilla can represent both ends of the issue. I think the MonsterVerse incarnation is a good example of this. He could very easily be a threat to humanity if we do something he doesn't like, but at the same time, he's also our biggest saving grace against worse threats like the MUTOs and Ghidorah.

And that's my take on the issue.

Putting incorrect opinions in their place! Gatekeeping power!!

Gmkgoji #TeamRodan

Nov-05-2019 4:11 PM

Well said, friend of Titan.

Godzilla x Symphogear:

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG

G. H. (Gman) #TeamGhidorah

Nov-05-2019 9:53 PM

Titan of Water,
I've heard this argument before and the problem is that while nuclear power and radioactivity can be a "neutral" tool Godzilla has always been about the warnings of that tool.

Whether or not radioactivity is good or bad is irrelevant, because this franchise was birthed on one side of the issue. Honda himself even hoped the original film would put an end to all nuclear proliferation. Tanaka wanted to maintain the anti-nuclear theme throughout the Heisei series, which is why he attacks a nuclear reactor ever so often. Godzilla films have not always been about nuclear proliferation, granted, but it began that way and has been a reoccurring theme throughout the 65 years of the franchise.

Garbage like magical radiation triggering regrowth, a Japanese character setting off an atomic bomb (which by the way, doesn't even have that much radiation, it's mostly just an explosive, making the entire point of detonating it moot) and the use of Burning Godzilla as a video game-y finishing move negates much of what the franchise has been about. It's my biggest issue with the film and I can't believe we live in a world where there's a pro-nuclear Godzilla flick.

--
"It wouldn't be a true Godzilla film if you didn't touch upon those things. Anyone who thinks otherwise is not a true Godzilla fan." - Mike Dougherty, fellow gatekeeper-elitist ;)


KaijuWorld #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 3:50 AM

"Sometimes the only way to heal our wounds is to make peace with the demons who created them". I think this sentence pretty much sums it up.

Godzilla: King of the monsters is one of the best cinema experiences I have had in quite a while.

KaijuWorld #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 3:50 AM

Titan of water got it spot on in my opinion.

Godzilla: King of the monsters is one of the best cinema experiences I have had in quite a while.

Monster_Zero 2112 #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 7:02 AM

In 1992, science fiction writer Kenichiro Terasawa is writing a book about Godzilla and learns of a group of Japanese soldiers stationed on Lagos Island during the Gilbert and Marshall Islands campaign. In February 1944, while threatened by American soldiers, the Japanese soldiers were saved by a mysterious dinosaur. He theorizes that the dinosaur was subsequently mutated into Godzilla in 1954 after a hydrogen bomb test on the island. Yasuaki Shindo, a wealthy businessman who commanded the Japanese soldiers on Lagos Island, confirms that the dinosaur did indeed exist.

Meanwhile, a UFO lands on Mount Fuji. When the Japanese army investigates, they are greeted by Wilson, Grenchiko, Emmy Kano and the android M-11. The visitors, known as the "Futurians", explain that they are humans from the year 2204, where Godzilla has completely destroyed Japan. The Futurians plan to travel back in time to 1944 and remove the dinosaur from Lagos Island before the island is irradiated in 1954, thus preventing the mutation of the creature into Godzilla. As proof of their story, Emmy presents a copy of Terasawa's book, which has not yet been completed in the present.

The Futurians, Terasawa, Miki Saegusa, and Professor Mazaki, board a time shuttle and travel back to 1944 to Lagos Island. There, as American forces land and engage the Japanese forces commanded by Shindo, the dinosaur attacks and kills the American soldiers. The American navy then bombs the dinosaur from the sea and gravely wounds it. After Shindo and his men leave the island, M-11 teleports the dinosaur from Lagos Island to the Bering Strait. Before returning to 1992, the Futurians secretly leave three small creatures called Dorats on Lagos Island, which are exposed to radiation from the hydrogen bomb test in 1954 and merge to become King Ghidorah, which then appears in present-day Japan. After returning to 1992, the Futurians use King Ghidorah to subjugate Japan and issue an ultimatum, but Japan refuses to surrender.

Feeling sympathy for the Japanese people, Emmy reveals to Terasawa the truth behind the Futurians' mission: in the future, Japan is an economic superpower that has surpassed the United States, Russia, and China. The Futurians traveled back in time in order to change history and prevent Japan's future economic dominance by creating King Ghidorah and using it to destroy present day Japan. At the same time, they also planned to erase Godzilla from history so it would not pose a threat to their plans. After M-11 brings Emmy back to the UFO, she reprograms the android so it will help her.

Terasawa discovers that a Russian nuclear submarine sank in the Bering Strait in the 1970s and released enough radiation to mutate the dinosaur into Godzilla. Shindo plans to use his nuclear submarine to rejuvenate Godzilla. En route to the Bering Strait, Shindo's submarine is destroyed by Godzilla, who absorbs its radiation and becomes larger and more powerful. Godzilla arrives in Japan and is met by King Ghidorah. They fight at equal strength, each immune to the other's attacks. With M-11 and Terasawa's aid, Emmy sabotages the UFO's control over King Ghidorah, causing the three-headed monster to lose focus during the battle. Godzilla eventually ends the battle by blasting off Ghidorah's middle head. Before sending King Ghidorah crashing into the ocean, Godzilla destroys the UFO, killing Wilson and Grenchiko before turning its attention on Tokyo, destroying the city and killing Shindo.

Emmy travels to the future with M-11 and returns to the present day with Mecha-King Ghidorah, a cybernetic version of King Ghidorah. The cybernetic Ghidorah blasts Godzilla with energy beams, which proves useless. Godzilla then counters by relentlessly blasting Ghidorah with its atomic breath before Ghidorah launches clamps to restrain Godzilla. Ghidorah carries Godzilla out of Japan, but Godzilla breaks from its restraints and causes Ghidorah to send both crashing into the ocean. Emmy then returns to the future but not before informing Terasawa that she is his descendant.

At the bottom of the ocean, Godzilla awakens and roars over Ghidorah's remains before swimming away.

and

Miki Saegusa of the United Nations Godzilla Countermeasures Center (UNGCC) travels to Birth Island to check on Godzilla and his adopted child Godzilla Junior, but finds the entire island destroyed. Godzilla appears in Hong Kong, covered in glowing lava-like rashes, and goes on a rampage. The JSDF hires college student Kenkichi Yamane, the grandson of Dr. Kyohei Yamane, to work at the center in an attempt to unravel the mystery of Godzilla's condition. Yamane suspects that Godzilla's heart, which acts as a nuclear reactor, is undergoing a nuclear meltdown as a result of Godzilla absorbing the energy released from a uranium deposit on Birth Island that had been triggered by a volcanic eruption. Yamane theorizes that when Godzilla's temperature reaches 1,200 °C, he will explode with a force approximately "1,000 times greater than all nuclear weapons put together, a burst of power unseen since time began," which will be hot enough to ignite Earth's atmosphere and reduce the planet's surface to ash.

The JSDF deploys a flying combat vehicle outfitted with anti-nuclear cold weapons, the Super-X III, in an effort to reverse Godzilla's self-destruction. Meanwhile, scientists discover that Dr. Serizawa's Oxygen Destroyer, which was used against the original Godzilla in 1954, has awoken and mutated a colony of Precambrian organisms lying dormant in Tokyo Bay. The creatures combine into several man-sized crab-like creatures and begin wreaking havoc. After several deadly skirmishes with the JSDF, the creatures, dubbed "Destoroyah", evolve beyond the military's containment abilities.

Due to his encounter with the Super-X III, Godzilla will not explode, but will instead suffer a bodily meltdown which could potentially destroy the planet. Miki is instructed to telepathically lure Godzilla Junior to Tokyo, hoping that Godzilla will follow and be killed by Destoroyah. Junior arrives and fights Destoroyah, who is seemingly defeated after being blown into an electrical plant. Godzilla arrives at Haneda Airport, where he witnesses a now fully mature Destoroyah kill Junior.

Godzilla tries to revive Godzilla Junior, but fails, accelerating the meltdown through his grief. Destoroyah reappears, and Godzilla seriously injures the monster in the ensuing battle. Destoroyah tries to retreat, but the JSDF shoots it down with a number of freeze weapons designed to work against Godzilla, and it dies upon touching the ground super-heated by Godzilla.

Godzilla begins to die from the meltdown, but the JSDF is able to minimize the damage with the freeze weapons. While successful in preventing Earth's destruction, the JSDF is unable to prevent the massive nuclear fallout from rendering Tokyo uninhabitable. Suddenly, the radiation levels plummet and a familiar roar is heard and the JSDF sees that Godzilla Junior, having absorbed the energy from the original Godzilla's death, has not only regenerated but grown into the new Godzilla.

G. H. (Gman) #TeamGhidorah

Nov-06-2019 7:18 AM

Why are we copying and pasting wikipedia synopses from Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah and Godzilla vs. Destoroyah now?

--
"It wouldn't be a true Godzilla film if you didn't touch upon those things. Anyone who thinks otherwise is not a true Godzilla fan." - Mike Dougherty, fellow gatekeeper-elitist ;)


Monster_Zero 2112 #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 7:19 AM

Godzilla is a metaphor for the atomic fears that Japan had after both atomic bombs. The fear rose again after they learned about the 1954 Castle Bravo nuclear testing on Bikini Atoll in the south pacific, just like how Kong is a metaphor for mother nature , He's big and really cool, but is really dangerous. "We cannot command nature, except by obeying her".

Monster_Zero 2112 #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 7:22 AM

G.H. (Gman)

Sorry,I thought we were talking about why Godzilla became Burning Godzilla and why Serizawa used the nuke to revive him, so I thought I'd put the reasons why they used it in KOTM.

Titan of Water #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 9:42 AM

The long essay is from my friend not me he wanted to give his opinion but he didn’t have a sci-fi account so I posted it for him.

Putting incorrect opinions in their place! Gatekeeping power!!

Monster_Zero 2112 #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 10:13 AM

That's cool.

TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 10:18 AM

G.H. (Gman)

 

I agree, I love the original message and how it has almost always persisted throughout the series. HOWEVER, I do believe it is KINDA ok if we see Godzilla as a pro-nuclear metaphor in the Monsterverse. I mean, Godzilla has been through many drastic changes over his 65 years, as have many other long standing franchises. So, I believe there should be an idea change in some series too. Every movie series has many drastic changes, even ideally. Sometimes new ideas behind an old series can make for an interesting movie and debate. I love the old message and definitely agree with it, which is partially why I like Shin Godzilla so much. But, if this theory is true, then the Monsterverse is unique in how it represents the other side of the coin, of how nuclear power can be used for good. And I love that. Just like how Godzilla movies have changed political viewpoints over the years, I feel like this is another one that CAN change too. It would be incredibly interesting to see a Godzilla series with this viewpoint. Actually, technically we might have seen this before in Godzilla: The Series. The central theme of the first few episodes was "Don't kill Godzilla. We have a mutation on our side, and trust me, there will be more." Replace Godzilla with nuclear weapons program, and mutation with nuclear power, then it kind becomes a metaphor for pro-nuclear. And look what kind of legend that series has become! Changing Godzilla into an almost completely different Kaiju with depth, intriguing behaviour, and a very different message. And it actually came out pretty well. So this kind of idea seems to have been attempted, or at least accidentally done, before. I just feel like a Godzilla series should be able to represent different points of view without being criticized too much for it. However, if they changed the central message to something, like, cookies taste good (IDK, I'm sleepy), then the message deserves some hate. Trying, or accidentally, showing a different point of view on nuclear power, then I think it could turn out pretty interesting, even though I prefer the original message.

 

Sorry if that was a rant and impossible to understand, but as I mentioned before, I'm very sleepy. 

 

TL;DR: I think it'd be interesting to see Godzilla series with different messages, so long as it isn't a hate thing or an obvious one or something. Still prefer the OG message though. Sleepiness.

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

G. H. (Gman) #TeamGhidorah

Nov-06-2019 12:38 PM

I don't agree at all. I think it's fine to use Godzilla for other themes and ideas relevant to its country of origin and it has: It's warned about unchecked capitalism, it's warned about nationalism, it's tackled pollution, it's spoken about socio-economic decline and the death of nuclear families--But in many of those instances is still an anti-nuclear stance.

In Monster Zero Godzilla is found by a Geiger counter, the only reference to radioactivity in the movie, but a subtle reminder of what spawned him. In Godzilla vs. Megalon, even as Godzilla's a superhero, warnings against nuclear proliferation are tackled at the beginning of the film when Monster Island's inhabitants are fleeing the radioactive fallout and negative effects from nearby testing. (Less we forget, Godzilla has always been a victim of the bomb and Megalon, surprisingly, was one of the few to remind us.)

Unchecked nuclear policies are explored in The Return of Godzilla and Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah. Radiation is even the reason he died in Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, since the ignited uranium deposits turned him in to Burning Godzilla--Which is more akin to a terminal illness than a power-up.

The point is, even though Godzilla's messages and themes have evolved with the times, the franchise has never left behind the basic core of its genesis: The dangers of wide-spread nuclear proliferation. That is the heart, soul and guts of Godzilla at ground zero and to go the other direction is a slap in face. It's like a Star Trek movie/series that advocates xenophobia instead of embracing other cultures--That's not what Star Trek's core is about.

I'm all for different messages and themes in the Godzilla series, but ones that contradict the core tenants of the franchise miss the point altogether. Even GINO did better with that theme--Which is the one time you'll ever hear me say something remotely positive about that cesspool of a movie.

I certainly hope Godzilla vs. Kong tackles some different topics, if any at all, in the next movie. (It might be better of just being mindless.) The muddled stance the Monsterverse movies are taking with nuclear power/radiation is one of the chief reasons I'm fine with it ending after the next movie.

--
"It wouldn't be a true Godzilla film if you didn't touch upon those things. Anyone who thinks otherwise is not a true Godzilla fan." - Mike Dougherty, fellow gatekeeper-elitist ;)


TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 1:26 PM

I agree that I'd PREFER it, but I don't think it should be the defining thing of a Godzilla series. Fair points, though. Let's just agree to disagree

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

Gmkgoji #TeamRodan

Nov-06-2019 1:33 PM

Godzilla x Symphogear:

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG

Titan of Water #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 2:22 PM

Maybe KOTM should have ignored the nuclear theme and focused on just the climate change theme. That would’ve been better than pretending to have a anti-nuclear pretense while the writers have a more pro-nuclear stance in real life. I think it’s stupid to go against your principles just to appease other people. Now I personally don’t think Godzilla movies should show nuclear proliferation in a positive light in respect of the original. Maybe Godzilla films can do what the Lorax did and show both perspectives. They could take an anti-nuclear stance but they could have 3 dimensional, likable characters who take a pro-nuclear stance who make good points. That way they could stay true to the Original Godzilla but still have opportunity to explore a different perspective.

Putting incorrect opinions in their place! Gatekeeping power!!

Gomi: Ninja Monster #TeamMothra

Nov-06-2019 3:10 PM

I know I'll get flak for being "that guy," especially after this seems to have reached a conclusion, but I think we may be reading too far into this. Why couldn't the plant regrowth and Burning powerup just be things they put in because they needed a way to quickly restore the status quo or thought it would be a cool reference and set piece. It just smacks of that "the curtains are blue" joke. But that in itself is a different long discussion entirely, so I'll skip over that and move on to my more relevant point.

Remember, Toho signed off on this. They were there in the creative process, and they let it go through as we got it. If Nuclear power being used for good was such an egregious offence against the core of the franchise, why didn't they change it? Where's the outrage from Japan and the announcement of "Godzilla 2020" to right the wrongs done to their IP? Toho has said they look forward to working more with Legendary and WB, and yes I know money is a big factor, but '98 made plenty of money, why didn't that get sequels? I just feel like this is less of an issue than some seem to be making it out to be.

G. H. (Gman) #TeamGhidorah

Nov-06-2019 4:29 PM

"Why couldn't the plant regrowth and Burning powerup just be things they put in because they needed a way to quickly restore the status quo or thought it would be a cool reference and set piece."

Initially I was willing to give it that benefit of the doubt. But even if that were the case then it makes the filmmakers look tone deaf and incompetent. In which case I could let it slide, but it also speaks to how dumb the movie really is.

And then the audio commentary was released where Dougherty mentioned Chernobyl as an example of Mother Earth regenerating after radiation had left it uninhabitable for so many years. There's this false perception that Chernobyl is now a flourishing haven of regrowth--But that's not true. Radiation doesn't outright kill nature, it messes it up. To this day vegetation in Chernobyl can not rot, making it impossible for nutrients from dead plants to return to the ground. Birds are born with smaller brains and shorter lifespans. And predators that have left the radiation zone are poisoning plants and livestock, making it difficult to put this stuff on the market.

So not only does Dougherty seem to believe this stuff, but it feels like he's spreading misinformation.

"Remember, Toho signed off on this."

They signed off on GINO as well. And why? To get back in to the international market.

That said I don't believe what Toho thinks is what makes it an "egregious offense." That's pitting principles against the whims of business. But if the argument is really principles vs. principles, then clearly this pro-nuclear stance is in violation of franchises very foundation. It's part of what sets Godzilla apart from other monsters and other monster franchises and to alter that so drastically helps close the loop that now he's just another other big monster. I know some fans who have left the franchise/fandom entirely because of it and while I can't bring myself to stop enjoying the majority of what came pre-Godzilla: King of the Monsters, I understand why they think it's an end point for Godzilla--On multiple levels.

--
"It wouldn't be a true Godzilla film if you didn't touch upon those things. Anyone who thinks otherwise is not a true Godzilla fan." - Mike Dougherty, fellow gatekeeper-elitist ;)


TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 6:03 PM

Titan Of Water

Exactly, but I think they should go further with that. The MAIN reason I'm in favor of the pro nuclear message in this one is so that they can make Godzilla a DESTROYER in another movie, like in GVK. It would show nuclear power on both sides of the spectrum, and set up the "Godzilla isn't quite a protector, he's a neutral force that usually ends up siding with us" type shtick which would exemplify nuclear power PERFECTLY. 

 

If that didn't make sense, the main reason I support this pro-nuclear stance is so they can go back on it in GVK or a following Godzilla movie, and he'll be AGAINST us, as foretold at the end of KOTM. It'd show Godzilla, and nuclear power, as a neutral force, which is kinda what it is, and kinda what Godzilla was in the Heisei and Millenium eras. In my opinion, that would be kind of genius. Who knows, maybe in GVK Godzilla will be a "bad" guy again and Kong will be brought by Monarch to try and stop him? Maybe he'll be looking for some radiation fixes from nuclear plants since his home that was stocked with radiation was destroyed?

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

Gomi: Ninja Monster #TeamMothra

Nov-06-2019 6:32 PM

Okay, so I'll admit I know very little hard facts about Chernobyl, but the Wikipedia page seems to imply that from the limited studies that have been done, while mutations are still more prevalent than normal, (I'd reckon due to all the quarantine) the wildlife populations are probably higher than before the disaster. So it might stink for humans, but "Nature" seems to be managing fine enough, which I believe is what people usually mean when they say stuff like that. I also found nothing on that plant bit and it frankly sounds incredibly suspect, but again I have done no real research, provide me some sources and I'll happily change my tune. I could easily propose a decent in-universe reason for the specific peculiarities of the Titan Radiation, but that's not really the point so I'll spare you the fanfiction.

Maybe, but what did they do after that? Mock it and denounce it, I haven't seen much of that for Legendary yet except in the US.

Toho is still the same company that made Shin, so they must have some integrity in there. And there's always the anime trilogy if you need something without all that Hollywood shlock gumming up the works. Also of note, when Godzilla was conceived nuclear power was just beginning to be explored, and it's first major use was in an act of war. Godzilla was made in response to that, not nuclear energy in concept. If the franchise at its core exists just to decry an entire branch of scientific and technological potential, than that's just backwards. Batman can be Batman without bringing up his tragic backstory every hour, the same goes for Godzilla. I imagine a similar falling out came after '98 for different reasons, yet here we are. One or two missteps does not invalidate everything that came before and can come after. If some bad writing and not shouting "Nukes bad" for the 35th time is what it takes for the whole franchise to lose it's appeal to someone, than...I don't know, but it just seems shallow. Why stop loving something because you didn't like the newest part of it?

TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 7:26 PM

Gomi: Ninja Monster

To add onto that, as mentioned at the end of KOTM, Godzilla will probably do something AGAINST humanity soon, therefore balancing out the good with bad and making him a neutral force. Once again, making nuclear power a neutral force, which is what it really is. It wouldn't be half bad if a Godzilla explored the pros and cons of nuclear power. 

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

Gomi: Ninja Monster #TeamMothra

Nov-06-2019 8:46 PM

TheLazyFish

Agreed, and I'd love if the MonsterVerse has been playing 4-D chess with us this whole time, but that remains to be seen. Personally, if the MV can make it past GvK I'm positive the Oxygen Destroyer will be coming back to bite them, along with the general message of "you invented this new thing just to kill without thinking about the consequences, now reap what you sow." It would perfectly retroactively contextualize how offhanded it's use was in KoTM, both lampshading it and integrating it into the world in a much more meaningful way.

TheLazyFish #TeamGodzilla

Nov-06-2019 9:43 PM

Maybe the oxygen destroyer mutates something in the waters into Destoroyah? Maybe it makes Godzilla more aggressive towards humans, or it makes him need to consume more radiation, thus causing him to attack nuclear plants? 

If people weren't lazy, we'd get nothing done

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